Life with MS & EDS

November 4, 2009

Good-Bye Trial, Hello Rebif?

Last week I saw Dr. Specialist. Our discussion started out with, “I don’t think it’s a good idea for you to go without treatment for three months,” which is what I’d have to do to be part of the trial. I responded with, “So, I guess you have the MRI results,” which she did. It was a mixed picture.

The good news is that my upper spine is looking better, for the most part. The lesions in the cervical spine demonstrated either a “mild decrease in expansion” or were stable. Some decreased in “conspicuity” however one was more “conspicuous” than before (meaning they can see the lesion more clearly now.)

Moving further down the spine, the news got worse. Multiple lesions are stable in the thoracic spine, but there is new enhancement and extension of the lesions at T9-10.

The theory is that Copaxone isn’t working. Dr. Generalist would say that it’s too soon to know this, but I’m siding with Dr. Specialist on this one. I’ve been on the Copaxone since early February and seeing a new lesion and increased enhancement in October cannot be a good sign.

After this lovely discussion I got to do the standard “drunkard” tests. I can still walk a straight line, walk on my toes, walk on my heels, touch my finger to my nose and then her moving hands, see the correct number of fingers, etc. There was a medical student with her during the exam which was interesting. They were both fascinated at how far up I was able to get my feet when walking on my heels. We then had a nice discussion about Ehlers-Danlos and I was able to help education the med student. It almost seems as if the Ehlers-Danlos symptoms are making having MS easier than it would be otherwise. I don’t have the spasticity symptoms that can accompany MS. I may have poor balance, but my bendiness keeps me from falling over. I’m not sure there is any medical evidence behind this, so it’s just an observation on my part.

If I failed any of the drunkard tests, she didn’t mention anything. I’m pretty sure the only part of the exam that showed anything was the eye exam. I can still read the 20/20 line without glasses, but my right optic nerve is still pale and my color vision in that eye is still decreased. I’m pretty positive this is a permanent condition at this point. It’s generally not annoying, except that I’m having a hard time getting used to taking pictures with my left eye (I know, I should use the screen on the digital camera, but there’s still something about looking through the view finder that I can’t give up.)

We then talked about next steps. I need to get the brain MRI since I won’t be doing that as part of the study. That’s scheduled for next week. I don’t think they’ll find much. MS seems to be eating my spine, not my brain. Once we have those results, we’ll talk about whether or not to do a course of IV steroids again. I really hope to avoid that. We’ll also have a talk about switching off Copaxone and moving over to Rebif.

I’m less than thrilled about the idea of switching to Rebif, but when comparing the side effects of the interferon drugs (e.g., flu-like symptoms, potential liver damage, etc.) against the continued degradation of my spine, I think Rebif comes out on top. It’s only 3 times a week, so at least I will have less shots! There’s a positive part, right? Also, since I won’t get to do the study, I get to keep my Mirena (yeah!) I’m trying to look on the bright side. I have way fewer symptoms than I probably should have given the number of lesions on my spine and if starting Rebif will help fight the progression of my MS, I’m going to give it a try.

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2 Comments »

  1. Hey there!

    Just a few words…. I was also on Copaxone for 6 months, and like you, I continued to get new and enhancing lesions. I also had 4 (I think) relapses in that 6 months. I switched to Rebif in May, and haven’t had a relapse since! Yes, the flu-like symptoms were rough, but after about 3 months they went away. I’m not saying all is rosy now, but definitely better than when I was on Copaxone. I hate switching meds, but this one worked for me. Plus, only 3 times per week instead of daily.

    Good luck in making your decision.
    Take care,
    Erin

    Comment by Erin — November 5, 2009 @ 3:39 pm

  2. I remember reading that you had switched, but forgot what drug you moved onto. I’m glad to hear that your body adjusted after 3 months. I’m hopeful I’ll have the same luck.

    I do love that it would be only have shots 3 days a week. That’s certainly a positive part! I kind of hope that we decide to go with Rebif. She did say that she didn’t think I was severe enough for Tysabri yet. I was shocked that she even brought it up. I have high hopes for Rebif.

    Comment by mseds — November 5, 2009 @ 4:00 pm


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